FACULTY

Childers NYC
Childers NYC

Me, checking out the fantastic view from the new Whitney Museum (2015

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Women and Gender Studies
Women and Gender Studies

A packed house in attendance at the February 2016 Women & Gender Studies Roundtable, which was written and presented entirely by my students in the Women | Art | History class

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Shiva Lal Filter Test
Shiva Lal Filter Test

Shiva Lal, Laboratory: filter test (1857). Gouache on mica. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

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Air, Speed and Steam
Air, Speed and Steam

Bhupen Khakhar, Air, Steam, and Speed (1972)

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My research centers on Indian art, especially in the 18-20th centuries, during the colonial period—a fascinating time of drastic social, political, and economic transformations, all of which had a great impact on the art. In the two courses I teach on the subject ("Arts of Ancient India" and "Mughals to Modern") we not only look at sculpture, architecture, and painting, but we also watch Bollywood clips, listen to Indian music from across the centuries, and consider popular culture.

 

In my current project, I examine the visual culture of opium in British India, with attention to popular images, photography, and exhibitions of the production side of the drug.

 

When I'm not working, I'm gardening, cooking, knitting, or walking—always in motion!

 

Other courses I teach:

  • Global Arts: Contemporary Asian Art in a Transnational Age

  • Women | Art | History: Feminist Art in a Global Frame

  • Art & The Machine

  • Histories of Non-Western Photography

Hope Childers

Division Chair and Associate Professor 

Me
Me

At least, this is an image of my ideal self, sitting and reading on the beach in California--I am a native San Franciscan. It turns out that I am the one always behind the camera—so, if you wish to see me, come to Binns-Merrill B-30, just down the hall from Moka Joka. You’ll find me there Wednesday afternoons and many other times. By the way, this is a detail of a painting by the fabulous postwar artist, Richard Diebenkorn. I am reading about his Berkeley work at the moment.

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Van Gogh, Self-Portrait (Detail)
Van Gogh, Self-Portrait (Detail)

This spring Kevin Wixted and I are team-teaching a course on modern painting that examines techniques, mark-making, and surface.

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Field Trip
Field Trip

Image of students on field trip to Jonathan Klein’s basket making studio in Ithaca. Every summer I take students on a series of field trips to regional locations; this summer, a one-time course on contemporary glass will include an all-paid admission to the international Glass Art Society conference being held in Corning.

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Mary Drach McInnes 

Professor

I am a professor of art history with a focus on modern and contemporary sculpture; I teach at the School of Art and Design, Alfred University.  Over the past decade, I have broadened my pedagogical interests to embrace the specific realm of glass and ceramic art as well as the broader discourse in craft practice. My current course offerings include: “Silica:  Contemporary Glass and Ceramic Art,” “In, Of, and Around Contemporary Craft,” and, in concert with the 2016 Glass Art Society meeting in Corning,  “Glass in a New Light.”

My classroom advocacy for contemporary sculpture, craft, and craft-based practices has extended into my research and professional activities.  My abridged curriculum vitae (below) highlights a number of writings for exhibition catalogs on ceramics (and, recently, in glass), my oral histories conducted for the Smithsonian’s Laitman Documentation Project for American Craft, my ongoing editorial advising for the international, scholarly journal entitled Interpreting Ceramics, and my chairing of the first College Art Association (CAA) panel on contemporary ceramics.  

My engagement with materials—glass and ceramic—outside of the mainstream critical framework has been a critical element in my rethinking and revising of modern art history.  I seek to broaden the critical boundaries of these areas. My lectures are aimed at provoking the glass and ceramic communities to question their received history and to expand their references for contemporary art production.

  • Contemporary Projects in Art 

  • Glass in a New Light 

  • Picasso in Context 

  • Modern Art from the Periphery 

  • Viewing Sculpture 

 

 

Gerar Edizel 

Professor

Gerar Edizel received his Ph.D. and M.A. degrees from Cornell University, and his MFA from Southern Illinois University. In addition to his administrative work at Alfred University, he has taught courses in the history of Contemporary and New Media Art. Additionally, he has directed the conference Electronic Intersections, editing and publishing its proceedings in a bilingual catalog under the aegis of the Institute for Electronic Arts. Edizel has served as the Interim Dean of the School from 2015 until 2017 when he was appointed Dean of the School of Art and Design and served until 2020 in that capacity. Edizel helped advance the national and international reputations of Alfred University’s School of Art and Design and led the faculty through a successful effort for re-accreditation by NASAD before he returned to practicing his passion: teaching.

 

A few of Edizel's accomplishments as Dean include:

  • Increased domestic and international enrollments in the SOAD

  • Launching the University’s MFA program in painting with residency in Dusseldorf, Germany

  • Improving safe working conditions in the School’s facilities

  • Comprehensively overhauling glass studios with state-of-the-art equipment

  • Increased fundraising for the SOAD

  • Supervising the expansion of the School’s Summer Arts Workshops

 

The following are some of the courses he has introduced and taught:

  • Issues and Debates in Contemporary Art

  • Contemporary Projects in Art

  • Art in the Age of Digital Recursion

  • Art and Social Ideals

  • The Ideal Body

  • Art, Power and Censorship

  • 18th Century Art

lecturing in the lobby of HH
lecturing in the lobby of HH
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ROCW4022
ROCW4022
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Slide21
Slide21
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WechatIMG240
WechatIMG240
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James Hansen  Assistant Professor

James Hansen is an Assistant Professor of Art History (Contemporary Art and New Media). His research focuses on the integration of consumer technologies in artistic practice, particularly in the moving image and time-based media. He received his PhD in History of Art from The Ohio State University and has an MA in Film Studies from Columbia University. His current research interests include contemporary experimental film, psychoanalytic object relations, LGBTQIA+ film, and temporal dislocation. He occasionally maintains a practice in film and video art. He is the co-programmer of Light Matter Film Festival.

 

  • Photography and the Moving Images

  • Art in Our Time

  • Global Contemporary Art Since 1989

  • Materiality in Experimental Film and Video Art

  • Global Video and Performance

jh lp slide copy
jh lp slide copy
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hansen light table
hansen light table
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1959 Octagonal Box
1959 Octagonal Box

Examining Tomimoto Kenkichi’s resplendent 1959 octagonal box with gold and silver overglaze at the Crafts Gallery of the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo.

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KYOTO
KYOTO

Examining utensils after an evening candle-lit tea gathering at the Rinzai Zen Buddhist temple Kōdai-ji, Kyoto. I was in Kyoto January 10 - August 10, 2017 researching tea bowls in preparation for an exhibition I am curating for the Alfred Ceramic Art Museum.

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ARTH 120 Encounter Japan
ARTH 120 Encounter Japan

Participants in the ARTH 120 Encounter Japan program at Nikko Toshogu Shrine.

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To see more information about the Art & Design/ Art History Faculty, visit the Faculty Profile page on Alfred University's official website. 

Meghen Jones
 Associate Professor 

My work centers on the histories of ceramics, East Asian art, and modern craft theory in transnational perspective.  I recently co-edited the book Ceramics and Modernity in Japan (Routledge, 2019), and am currently curating an exhibition and editing a catalogue on the tea bowl as a global icon. 

 

My research has been supported by the Japan Foundation, the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures, the Fulbright Foundation and the Japanese Ministry of Education, among others.

 

Courses I teach include:

 

  • ARTH 126 Buddhist Arts of Asia

  • ARTH 128 Introduction to Material Culture

  • ARTH 300 Ceramics in Japan and Beyond

  • ARTH 300 History of Ceramics from the Late 19th Century to the Present

  • ARTH 300 History of Modern Design

  • ARTH 306 Arts of Japan

  • ARTH 307 East Asian Design & Material Culture

  • ARTH 436/536 Ceramic Art, Craft, and Design: Global Flows (graduate seminar)

  • ARTH 300 Anime to Zen: Contemporary Japanese Visual and Material Culture